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let between innovators coming from central europe and those coming from the plateau which has fostered a suspicious negotiation and character they can see right of into the politics in bucharest to this day and i can go to every country, not every but many countries and talk about but. >> talk for a moment about germany. one of the images germany has natural boundaries to the north and south with the alps and further burden the east and the west is flat plains, so germany had a war over the century with germany or france or that area and poland and because germany was a continental power sandwiched between the maritime europe on one hand and the heartland towards the other it was always problematic which we it would go and how it would develop. i can across this book by accident in early 1989. the berlin fall with -- berlin wall would fall but november. it had occurred to me after reading this book and other books that the berlin wall or the dividing line between eastern and western germany was one. creation of german history that would reinvested soften different territory always in t
turn away from democracy as eastern europe did 50 years ago? i talked to pulitzer prize winning historian anne happalbaum. >>> the administration had a choice save chrysler by injecting taxpayer dollars or let it fail and let it lose perhaps a million jobs. car czar steve ratner gives us a fascinating inside look. for viewers in the united states, we have a special tonight at 8:00 and 11:00 p.m. eastern and pacific called "tough decisions." >>> but, first, here's my take. announcing that he would send proposals on reducing gun violence in america to congress, president obama this week mentioned a number of sensible gun control measures. but he also paid homage to the conventional washington wisdom from mental health issues to school safety. his spokesman jay carney said earlier this is a complex problem that will require complex solution. gun control carney from the only answer. let me respectfully disagree. the problem is not complex and the solution is blindingly obvious. there are three sets of causes that people point to when talking about events like the one in newtown. fir
. >> it certainly has been very wet for some of us and the southeastern part of europe. using a massive cloud spinning around, giving us the very heavy downpours. further north, generally fine and subtle but it does mean this time of year it is also incredibly cold. don't adjust your sets -- this is the snow blowing through. a blizzard. we are seeing very cold conditions across many parts of russia down through to the ukraine and poland as well. snow and ice is already on the ground and causing quite a few problems with the driving as well. for many of us in the eastern parts of europe, it will stay very cold but the system over the southeastern parts will be spinning around and also giving heavy showers across parts of libya down through egypt as well. for the western parts of northern africa, mostly fine and subtle. not a great deal of problems with the weather. to the east, some of the showers could turn out rather strong. but whether it can also be making its way further to the east, too. already plenty of heavy downpours -- and more heading through thursday. all of it pushing steadily to
's largest trading partner, europe's economy remains on prepares you footing despite several months of relative calm and there's a growing debate abt whher e u.k should lead the e.u. earlier this month we covered the "economist" magazine read "good-bye europe, look what happened when britain left the e.u. " i'm pleased to have george osborne back on this program and back at this table. >> thank you very much. >> rose: you're in new york city for a speech at the manhattan institute. >> i did that last night and had some meetings on wall street, seeing them there later. >> rose: so what's your message about the british economy to manhattan institute as well as the mayor and wall street? >> well, the basic message is itaiis on for business. if you want to come and invest in a country that is dealing with its problems, cutting its business taxes, providing opportunities for companys to go britain is the place. i think we're doing better. >> rose: you do? >> i certainly do. >> rose: the numbers don't look like that. >> well, actually, look at the u.k. compared to many western economies,
of detail. i tried hard. i knew a lot of people in ben gadhafiments city, officials here, and then in europe, and they relied on local sources. the -- and the whole issue of how the united states became motivated to get involved is interesting, and, again, i go back to the issue of intelligence and what people didn't know about libya and what assumptions people were making. you know, it seemed like washington, between the the white house and state department, everybody had an idea of what should be done, advocatings on both sides, a ready group of the individuals, the power, and given rise to those looking for an opportunity to implement a responsibility to protect scenario that would succeed so that's a whole, you know, that's a whole section, again, as to what -- how did we come to intervene, and why was that actually a good idea? the next question, of course, is the one that everybody's talking about now, which i'll leave teem for questions, which is where is libya headed next? you know, with regards to what happens this benghazi, i think one needs to take -- regardless of all of the chao
are toking up. studies like this one in europe show too much marijuana affects coordination and judgment. >> one of the first and most important thing inability or reduced ability to divide one's ability. >> it's less debilitating than alcohol. canadian study shows those driving within three hours of smoking pot are twice as likely to cause a crash. >> another affect that we see are those driving under marijuana reduced ability to perceive time and distance. >> how much is too much? >> i feel we are in unchartered territory. >> the limit is five nanograms per blood sample. impairment is equal to alcohol. >> heavy users though not impaired can test positive weeks after smoking. also what you smoke and how you smoke it affects people differently. even experts don't know how much pot causes impairment. >> to say that two hits or two dosals would get me 5 nangram, it is impossible to make that. >> the compound in pot is thc, and it's stored in fat. user could test positive weeks after smoking. bottom line this is going to be argued and litigated. in alcohol we started at is 1.5 and game down
. onion lots of people, officials here and in europe, it relied on local folk sources. -- and the whole issue of how the united states became motivated to get involved is interesting. you know, again, i go back to the issue of intelligence and what people did know about would be and what assumptions people are making. it seemed like washington, everybody had a different idea of what should be done, and there were advocates on both sides, are ready group of individuals who wanted to up look for an opportunity to implement irresponsible protect some area that would succeed. so that is the whole section. this section again as to the how we came to intervene and why that was actually good idea. the next question, of course, is the one everyone is talking about now on which will leave more for questions. where is libya headed next. you know, i think with regard to what happened in and gusty, it is still -- i think everyone needs to take, regardless of all the chaos that is happening, step back, go up several thousand feet and looked at this process over a much longer not the time. we are sti
of war. two decades ago, with all eyes on europe, the united states prematurely celebrated victory over communism and an end to the cold war but in 1989, the same year the berlin wall fell, tanks roll spood tiananmen square crushing in a bloody massacre the hopes of the chinese people. while communism was gone in europe it was revitalized in the world's largest nation. pyongyang's missile launch awakens us to a fact that communism still casts a long shadow over asia. the nuclear proliveuation threaten not only our allies in the pacific but our own people as well. in asia the cold war never ended an the united states and south korean forces stand guard together on this last frontier. attempts to engage pyongyang over the past four years have been met with repeated prove cage. the kidnapping of two american journalists, repeated missile launches, one more nuclear test, the sinking of a south korean naval vessel with the loss of 46 lives and the shelling of a south korean island. how much more should we endure before we say enough is enough? sweet talking pyongyang only seems to inspire fu
. europe is going to be in the doldrums for quite some time. asia is not charging forward and some of the emerging markets are not charging forward as quickly as they were maybe a few years ago. but i think what all of you recognize and many of you have told me is that everybody is looking to america, because they understand that if we're able to put forward a long-term agenda for growth and prosperity that is broad based here in the united states, that confidence will not just increase here in the united states, it will increase globe balance leave. globally and i think we can get the kind of cycle that all of us have been waiting for and want to see. what is holding us back right now ironically is a lot of stuff that is going on in this town. and i know that many of you have come down here to try to see, is there a way that we can breakthrough the logjam and go ahead and get things done? and i'm here to tell you that nobody wants to get this done more than me. i know that you've got even a lot of briefings, let me just try to describe where the situation is right now with respect
factors going on here too. europe and are drowning in debt. china has a near $3 trillion reserve surplus. you've got demographics. europe and america are aging rapidly. in europe the population is shrinking. there is no such demographic problem in china. you add it all together, debt, demographics and growth rate china is indeed on course to become number one fairly soon. gregg, hold on a second. there is a danger in just extrapolating out from current trends. what's in place will go on forever. we did that with japan 30 years ago. got that one wrong. maybe we shouldn't be extrapolating like this with china. gregg: the other thing that is very conspicuous here is the enormous trade imbalance with china. our trade deficit with china has tripled over the last 10 years. point of fact i just looked it up today. we export 7%. they export 23% to the united states. isn't that a job killer for americans? >> yes it is. there is no question about it. many of the jobs which our fathers and grandfathers had in the united states left a generation ago or 10 years ago, they left for china and that's ba
" kim in third. >>> sales of champagne going flat in europe. with the continent's ongoing economic problems give them not a lot of reasons to pop open the bottles. >> open the prosecco. it's ten bucks a bottle and tastes almost the same. >>> when we come back, new threats against americans from one of al qaeda's most ruthless branches. >>> who is rolling into the playoffs in the nfl? stay with us to find out. ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ [ female announcer ] nothing gets you going quite like the power of quaker oats. today is going to be epic. quaker up. [ woman ] too weak. wears off. been there. tried that. ladybug body milk? no thanks. [ female announcer ] stop searching and start repairing. eucerin professional repair moisturizes while actually repairing very dry skin. it's so powerful you can skip a day... but light enough you won't want to. dermatologist recommended eucerin. the end of trial and error has arrived. try a free sample at eucerinus.com. you're always on, so we're always ready. tyson grilled & ready chicken. no preservatives, 98% fat free, and fully cooked. we'll take care
the u.s. becomes like greece. there a terrible economy with 26% unemployment, the highest in europe, and almost no job opportunities for young people frequently lead to riots in the streets. now here a leading democrat is suggesting cutting spending too quick -- too quickly is the real problem. >> the community is concerned about all of their as you teary too. there are many things you can do to reduce debt, but still have a a -- an aspect of the economy. >> some say europe's austerity is a drag on economic growth because it relies on taxation while failing to rein in the expansion of government. and that would seem to back up a republican theme in this fiscal cliff argument. >> if we raise taxes on the top two rates which is about a million small businesses who employ 25% of the workforce, it will cost us over 700,000 jobs and reduce economic growth and lower take home pay. that's a bad scenario. >> the lead negotiator on the republican side of the table facing mr. obama says raising taxes on upper income americans will not fix the huge problems this country is facing. >> even if t
from lansing. not one worker from europe's biggest bank, hsbc, will far us a criminal charge after they were accuses of failing to guard against terrorists, tax cheat and drug cartels but agreed to pay a record $1.9 billion fine to settle the case. that probably won't hurt this bank at all. last quarter, they reported $2.5 billion in net profit. according to the treasury, the failure to police transactions allowed hundreds of millions of dollars in drug money from mexican cartels to flow into the united states. the feds report the bank broke finance laws when they did business with iran and libya and cuba and others. under their deem with the feds, the bank will pay the record fine, change some policies, but not one bank employee will ever face criminal prosecution. the prosecutors say department of justice officials wanted to bring criminal charges but decided not to not because of a lack evidence but because it would put the future of the largest banks at risk. think of that. not because they didn't have the goods. they were worried about the banking system. this says clearly it
because many companies, high-tech companies from america, from europe, have subsidiaries in china, selling to chinese industries and trading companies. north korea works that system very well to end up with those kinds of high-tech items from outside china. and so while i can't speak specifically on the missile program i certainly can on the nuclear and yes, indeed, north korea buys european high-tech equipment and likely u.s. equipment. so it's a problem. china has been made aware of the problem but they haven't done enough and, i think this missile launch could be a further step. again if it happens, it could be another step in building pressure on china to enforce the u.n. security council sanctions on north korea and in fact to team up with the rest of the world to try to apply stronger sanctions and more effective sanctions on north korea. jon: kim jong-un and his father indicated, they proved time and time again they were more interested in having ballistic missiles and that kind of technology than they were in seeing their people fed. are you convinced that there is a way to impose
in missiles, -- winding machine. these things are used in missiles. europe has tightened up. they have been working actively in china to buy european- american-chinese goods. the government is not completed, but they're not doing enough. we're thinking that pressure needs to be brought on china. goods made in germany, sold by that company to the chinese company that thinks it will keep it in china, but in fact it is going to iran. all it a country of tr concern. we're thinking maybe it is time that china is called out on that. china needs to be pressured to stop a local in the system internationally that is being created to keep iran from outfitting its centrifuge program. that effort over time has had tremendous success. with more and more sanctions, it is been more successful. more purchases stopped, more interdiction's, more trouble for iran to make progress. >> in terms of u.s. non- proliferation programs, david is emphasizing some of the holes that exist, particularly in controls and lack of enforcement of existing sanctions legislation. what is your assessment of non- proliferation pr
reach israel today and that will be able to reach europe in the not-too-distant future and ultimately the united states. second, you would have, i think, a nuclear tarmd iran would ignite a nuclear arms race in the most volatile part of the world, and third, you -- i think a nuclear armed iran would be significantly more aggressive in placing like iraq and afghanistan and throughout the region in terms of trying to throw their weight around. so i think that this is one of those situations where the only acceptable alternative, the only good alternative is that the economic pressures bring enough popular unhappiness in iran because of economic disasters that are going on there, that the regime decides it is in its own best interests and for its own security. >> rose: that assumes rational thinking on their part. >> i think that they are not irrational. and, you know, to say that they are rational actors all the time, i don't accept that either, but when it comes to these kind of things, the one thing they don't want is a war with the united states. and so i think that this -- the only
this time on the southern coast of the mediterranean, it's very clear that europe will be vulnerable and indeed we will be worldwide, so it seems to me this is something that we should be involved in, but our friends in europe really have a lot at stake here, too. >> ambassador, we want to also ask you tonight about former vice-president dick cheney's latest remarks. now, last night he blasted president obama's foreign policy in the middle east. here's what he said in part. >> i think certainly in my conversations with many of those people, they no longer believe us. they no longer trust us. they no longer believe they can count on the united states of america to do what we did 20 years ago. our allies no longer trust us or have confidence in us and our adversaries no longer fear us. the president can make bold statement and bold talk as he did in the last couple of days but development in syria, but i don't think they care. > >> greta: ambassador, what do you think about the former vice-president's mark? >> sadly, i think he's on target. i don't think the administration has credibil
ham was the commander of europe. mike his decorations, the defense superior medal. the legion ofmeter with two oak leaf clusters, the bronze star medal and the joint service commendation medal. it's a privilege to have general ham with us here today, and on behalf of everyone assembled i'd like to thank him for his service to the country. please join me in welcoming general ham the floor and thanking the homeland policy institute for convening this event. general ham. [applause] >> i think you can probably abbreviate that introduction and say, i'm a pretty old soldier who has around for a long while. but one of the things you didn't hear in the introduction is any experience in africa. in fact that puts me in the category of most who have served in the united states military, because africa has not been a part of the world in which we have focused a lot of attention. certainly not during the majority of my career. so, when i was asked by secretary gates to -- if was interested in taking on this responsibility, i replied, frankly, with a great deal of enthusiasm. not knowing quite what
on our day every day. >> even by. >> we can't keep borrowing ore we'll be like europe. this is not a classroom exercise. look at wuper and see what happens if we continue down the path that. is a place we don't want to g. >> the budget director puts the bilk on medicare and medicaid and social security. >> they will drive federal spending up faster than our economy can grow . revenues will not keep up . so we have a problem. if you don't have enough revenues to pay for the spending, you have to borrow and on the track that we are on. if we go on doing who what is in the law over the next several decades. our public debt will rise faster than our economy can grow. when that maps, you have to pay interest on the debt and cretors can see your debt rising faster than your economy is growing and they charge more and more. it is a very bad situation. >> author brooks finds currentidates current debates misguided. >> it is simple as a family that does that. right now, you have a situation in which the government in its over speppeding ways tries to rationalize it by saying th
democrats and in europe. they need some time to be more able -- to be able -- they are very successful on the side of the opposition. right now in sight of the government, there is a tremendous responsibility. we have seen that from the parliamentarian elections were the muslim brothers in egypt but the majority. until the results, they lost 4 million of votes. this is why we have a responsibility in the united states to support democratic institutions not allowing any ideological block to hijack the revolution or the institutions. at the same time, not taking sides. that will have a negative impact. it is an important asset to combat the jihad tests or the extremists. -- jihadists or the extremists. the muslim brothers in tunisia .ccused this is why we have to a differentiates between the muslim brothers and the girondists. do not put all the islamists in one basket. -- jihadists. do not put all the islamists in one basket. are they committed to values. this is the most important thing. >> and we have seen in syria where they had a violent fight between the muslim brothers and the ala
to take down a jet liner in europe or africa. >> seth, isn't that the problem? what we saw in libya was all those weapons have gone missing. now they're elsewhere in northern africa and some got into the hands of hamas in gaza. syria seems to be libya on steroids in terms of the things that could go wrong. >> i think it's kind of ludicrous to provide them with surface to air missiles. i think what they need more than anything else is ammunition and small arms. they can do a lot with just that kind of activity. and really intelligence. especially with the internet going down, it's harder for them to communicate with each other. radios are down across the country. they need help in a range of ways. i think our intelligence apparatus and our special operations units can do this in general and have done this clandestinely over the years, so i think we can do this and provide some oversight. >> if we do it, do we have -- will it have any impact on the outcome? the u.s. does think strategically. like it or not, they do. if i'm giving you a gun, are you going to do something when you get i
spending cuts. that's the austerity trap that europe has found itself in, and it would be crazy for us to go in that direction. >> before we go, very quickly, yes or no. do we have a deal by the end of the year? >> yes. >> and what about you, doug? >> marginally, yes. 60/40 in favor of a deal but they've got to get moving. >> we'll have to see if it's a real deal or another kick of the can down the road or some other interim thing. thanks for being here. >>> "outfront" next, the u.s. military draws up new plans for a potential strike against syria as we learn more about that country's stockpile of chemical weapons. >>> plus -- the u.s. supreme court agrees to take on the issue of gay marriage. and is that a signal, is that a signal that for republicans, it may be time to reconsider its view on this? >>> and a nurse duped by a prank call leaking information about the duchess of cambridge is found dead. all of that coming up. [ female announcer ] research suggests cell health plays a key role throughout our lives. one a day women's 50+ is a complete multivitamin designed for women's heal
that movie. i was flying in europe on another airline, and the pilot, it was a really big plane that had extra seats in the cockpit, and before we took off one of the pilots came out and said come with me, and i went into the cockpit and they strapped me in and we took off and now we can tell everybody we flew with murdoch. >> roger murdoch. i'm an airline pilot. i'm like, what? but that actually happened. >> what is taller? you or the statue? >> the statue is taller and it's taller than every other statue. i am closest to the street so everybody sees my statue first. >> how tall? >> 17 feet. >> it's an acknowledgment of what i achieved. >> what prompted you to write a children's book? >> i had an issue with the fact that so many kids, especially inner city kids don't think they can be a success unless they are involved in sports or entertainment. you take a young man growing up in harlem or the south side of chicago or here in atlanta and he wants to be jay-z, and he wants to be lebron james or denzel washington and he doesn't really see how wide the world is in terms of where he can be
only industrial country that came out of second world war intact. europe was on its knees. germany and japan were rubble so we thought that was the natural order of things. it wasn't. and when the other industrial countries recovered we got world competition as we have. we ran into bankruptcies. chrysler now twice. we see that in the southern states where the transplants are without the unions. they weren't the ones who went bankrupt last -- in 2008 and 2009. so it really is a choice. it's a tough choice. and i sympathize with the unions but the fact is that in the global economy where you have to compete on wages and other elements, of the units of production, can you either have, you know, high wages with low employment or you can, as obama would say, spread around the wealth. the fact is that in the right-to-work states, unemployment is 6.9%. >> we have a graphic that shows right-to-work vs. non-right to work statements on employment, go ahead. >> and in the other stays the non-right-to-work it's 8.7. so you can choose to have fewer workers who enjoy higher inflated unnatural, i
to be in great shape. >> we were on an airplane flying to europe, which we do every year, and we were up in a compartment just the two of us, and i woke up and it was just starting to get a little light. and i saw this figure with a shawl on and doing this mumbo jumbo, i thought maybe i had died. >> so then i said, when i tell the story, i say this is kind of man john mccain is. he things that heaven is populated by praying jews. what a guy. >> i had never known a person in my life that lives his religion to the degree that joe lieberman does. he's such a great contrast to people like me and lindsey because i've never seen him lose his temper. i've never seen him insult anyone, i've never seen him treat anyone but with the greatest courtesy. i cannot say that about lindsey or myself. >> your temper is legendary. >> very calm. >> very calm, level headed. >> absolutely. >> have you ever known him to not lose his temper? >> i just realized they do really -- >> 1973. >> they do a great service for me because i don't have to lose my temper, because they do it for me, they express it for me. y
of forces in europe, at sea and on land, it is not reasonable they could have responded. this was over in a matter of 20- 30 minutes with respect to special mission specifically. and we had no forces ready or tethered, if you will, to focus on the mission. to go there was no mention of the cia report despite their close to the pact and more personal than they had diplomats. did they share --- >> we cannot discuss classified organizations. >> thank you all very much. >> two committees are holding hearings today on the attack on the consulate in libya that killed four americans. the senate foreign relations committee. we will hear from william burns and others at 8:00 eastern. you can see that live on c- span2. he will go to the other side of the capital in the afternoon to testify before the house foreign affairs committee about the libya report. that is live on c-span3 at 1:00 eastern. in a few moments, today's headlines and your calls live on "washington journal." the house is in session at noon eastern to hear plan be addressing the so-called fiscal cliff. in about 45 minutes, we wil
and argentina and europe it is being used. the fda has approved it, and we expect it out soon. for people who can't have surgery. >> it helps with your sugar and with diabetes and weight loss. in massachusetts it is basically gi liner. it is a great treatment. >> all good topics. quick before we go, had a birthday on friday, and i got the most amazing birthday present ever. a special call from dr. dr. rosenfeld who remembered it was the 21st and called and wanted our viewers to know he sounded amazing and doing great and watching us now. thanks, doc, we love you very much. >> we miss them, of course. >> we will be right back -- no, we will be here. >> happy birthday to you. >> thank you. >> happy birthday. >>> all right, enough with the celebrating because congress is on a holiday break. the fiscal cliff deadline is still looming. hi, everybody. here we are. great to have you here. >> this is a brand-new hour of "america's news headquarters." as jaime said, lawmakers expect to return after christmas back to dc. they are thinking of getting back on thursday. that just gives them a few days to
but certainly this issue, i mean people are watching, i was talking to somebody today in europe and they were saying the only thing that is on the news there is whether the american politicians if you will are going to deal with this issue that is before us. so no doubt we are being made into lesser country he by virtue of our inability to deal with this. and greta, i think you know also that a month ago i offered a $4.5 trillion package to deal with this just so to show that these decisions are easy to make. tough medicine but easy to make. we know how they score and we should just get this behind us and i think what most of us wanted to see on our side of the aisle is putting this in the rear view mirror as we moved into january to begin the year again with an economy and investing public and a world that knew that we faced up to the responsibilities that we have in this great nation. again we stepped away from that and it is going to continue on but again i think our nation's greatness continues to dissipate as we digitter with the issue -- dither with an issue of the government growing in
advantage of the rest of the world besides america and europe that are on fire. we will be lucky to escape a double dip recession. we will bump along the road. >> you are not satisfied this is the new normal? >> no, capitalism is just trying to survive by the skin of its teeth. >> great stuff, guys. the president today not giving republicans an inch for spending cuts. >> if republicans think i won't finish the job -- will finish the job of deficit reduction through spending cuts if they think that is the formula if how we solve this thing, they have another thing coming. that is not how it will work. >> and ed henry on how this is playing out. that is your take on how close we may or may not be to a deal to avoid the fiscal cliff? >>guest: we have a framework on taxes. they are working out a deal on the massive spending hikes. taking an amount to it as the president said, not a scalpel and it could be too deep. we are a way of from dealing with that. but i make the point that it is still not clear whether a deal like this could make it through the senate. it seems likely the republican lea
in europe on the big 75% tax rate that the french wanted to pass for the rich. >> the breaking news that a french court said a 75% tax rate on individuals is unfair. so it has been rejected. the court court says unless you apply it to households it is not fair to single out individuals. that means 75% tax at this moment is not in effect. the french government and francois hollande says, it won't make any difference. we'll rewrite the law using new wording and we'll catch more people in the 75% tax rate net. heather: stuart varney, i know you have a lot of work to do today. it is a busy day financially. thank you. >> thank you. gregg: what will it mean if lawmakers fail to strike a deal? according to the tax policy center 90% of the americans would see a tax hike in 2013. 121 million people will be paying a whole lot more in payroll taxs. those are social security payroll taxs. families making between 40 and $65,000 a year will have to pay an extra two grand to the u.s. government. the more you make, boy, that number really accelerates. heather? heather: another devastating blow in t
headlines all over the world. conor powell begins with a financial crisis in europe. >> the eurozone continues with a huge financial hole. standard & poor's downgraded in nine countries in the union. financial ministers reaching an agreement on another greek bailout. a lot of trouble with debt ridden banks. europe demanding an end to stringent austerity measures that all this resulted in the eurozone going back into another recession. thirty-two people dead, including two americans off the coast of italy. when the cost of concorde a cruise ship runs aground >> more than 79 people killed and 8000 injured. a district court says that they would like to oust president hosni mubarak to life in prison. and mohammed morsi, of the muslim brotherhood party takes charge for it in november, he grants himself absolute power that brings thousands of protesters to the streets of cairo, egypt. three members of a russian all-female punk band stage a protest against vladimir putin are sent to jail for hooliganism. inciting worldwide protest and demand for the release. rupert murdoch launches into the
a stomach illness following a whirl wind trip through europe. that virus led to extreme dehydration, which caused her to faint and sustain a concussion. according to doctors at george washington university hospital and mt. kisko medical center, she's been recuperating at home since early december. secretary clinton also suffered a blood clot in her knee when she was first lady. in her autobiography, she said that doctors attribute it to her nonstop flying. now 65 years old clinton's air travel has only increased. illness has sidelined clinton during the final weeks of her term as secretary of state, causing her to cancel a december 20th appearance at congressional hearings into the attack on the benghazi consulate and the announcement of senator john kerry's nomination to succeed her as secretary of state. >> he has a deep respect for the men and women of the state department. >> reporter: clinton's last public appearance was december 7th in belfast, northern ireland. she spoke then about her upcoming retirement and said she looked forward to having time to relax and th
hours flight away from europe. jenna: why would we get involved there in northern mali and not get involved in other spots like syria for example, or in places like yemen where we hear there is a hotbed for terrorists at well? >> well i think part of the reason is that mali for many years a poster child of democracy and alleged stability in this region. it's a very crucial region of the just to the south of it is sub-saharan after can where we derive a great deal of our energy imports. places like nigeria and other places are very sensitive. just to the north this is libya which is still very, very unsettled. algeria which is yet to face the arab spring and reform. and north africa and egypt. this is a very critical region on the boarders of several areas that are very sensitive right now. jenna: what are the islamists doing in that area right now? >> well they're imposing their harsh brand of rule. they have destroyed a number of world heritage sites. islamic monuments ironically enough. they're imposing brutal punishments upon the people. more importantly from the security side t
coming from eastern europe and has the project blitz free is being led by a mysterious russian attacker and many targeted may not even realize it. >> you're someone with a substantial amount of money in your account. you logon one day and have a smaller amount than before but you've been hacked. that could happen to thousands of americans this coming spring. a new report says some of america's biggest banks, 30 of them, are at risk of a master cyber attack that could siphon millions of dollars from unsuspecting customers. >> we've found to date 3 and 500 devices that have been infected within the u.s. pat calhoon mcafee won't name the individual bank but account holders in many of the large mainstream banks are targeted. mcafee says this attack is from a cyber gag with a handle. >> he's trying to build attackers to expand the scope of the project. so that's the first thing. but how it's actually executed in the project itself is that he has computers that are basically monitoring and controlling all of these infected devices. >> calhoon says the attackers are going after individuals who
japanese americans had the highest casualsed in europe and the most tech crated in the history of the ute. then he turned and said i think the beneficiaries of the senator from illinois and the dream act will do the same. it was the type of short statement which captured in a few words his life, his sacrifice, what he had proven, by risking his life for this country. the reason we honor him. this morning. i close by saying two things. first, i think senator talked about his colleague of so many years and put it in a few years. he said on the floor last night, tomorrow willwill be the first day since hawaii became a state in 1959 that dane knew way will not be representing us. he really worked to shape ohio and this country. he said, you'll be missed in washington, as much as in hawaii. rays in peace, senator inouye. that summarizes how much he has meant to his and how much he has meant to america. hi last word, aloha, as senator reid said so appropriate. this kind and gentle american hero would leave with a greeting of love for everybody else. that was his life. i yield the floor. >> sena
europe and asia in terms of our -- in terms of our national natural gas. but it creates a better economy, high revenues that reduces the debt. >> senator, the same question to you. i'm wondering, this headline recently predicting that we're going to be -- the united states could be producing more oil than saudi arabia beginning in 2020. i mean, this is something almost unimagined 10 years ago. what is the role of the federal government from here on out, given that? >> i think the role of the federal government is to do things that encourage exactly that result and to follow up a little bit on the question of fiscal cliff, part of the way that you saw this fiscal problem issue grow our relative position in the economy relative to everybody else's. one of our big problems right now is the percentage of government spending is way more than it should be relative to total g.d.p. and part of that is because you don't have the growth in g.d.p. that the right kind of energy policies would produce. if there's an easier formula ever in the history of economics than more american energy equals more
of the neighbors of syria and our allies in europe, some of which have now been ahead of us, that we will focus in on this immediate really potentially disastrous threat of chemical and biological weapons. >> you said a moment ago that iran is our most dangerous enemy. if so, how far should we be willing to go to prevent iran from acquiring nuclear weapons? >> i just echo what everybody said. it's unacceptable for us to allow -- to become a nuclear state. containment is not an acceptable alternative. i think that is absolutely right. it changes the balance of power in the middle east. some of our allies to begin to accommodate. and it's a threat to most of the rest of the world. the sanctions, unprecedented so i think we have to the make sure that our threat of military actions, if they don't take down their nuclear equipment is credible. i'm still not sure it is. they have to believe that the u.s. will use our immense power to the civil the program if they don't. >> make one comment directly pertaining to the overall theme here. starting a long time ago, years ago our sanctions regime should n
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